The Harvest Lantern

Part of a group exhibition for 20 Minutes of Action curated by Sally Frater for the Art 4 Change conference- Unmasking Rape Culture and Gender Based Violence- a joint project with Centre[3] and SACHA in Hamilton, Ontario.

The Harvest refers to the predictable social patterns of gender based violence as a product of the confluence of colonial, white supremacist, heterosexist, ableist and patriarchal social power structures. Historical oppression, colonialism, systemic issues of inaccessibility, and some immigration legislations continue to inform social patterns of vulnerability to gender based violence, and to the predictability of high statistical rates that have maintained unchanged over time. Women at higher risk to gender based violence include Indigenous women; women with disabilities; young women; lesbian, bisexual, transgender and gender non-conforming folx; black and racialized women; women who have been previously sexually assaulted as children; and women who are newcomers, refugees, non-status, or working under precarious terms such as the Temporary Foreign Workers Program. It is when an intersection of these identities and status merge, that statistical rates of vulnerability becomes predictably high. 

The seeds of social oppression are cultivated, normalized and propagated over generations as we continuously fail to acknowledge our own participation, through overt and subtle implicit bias, as socialized agents in propagating and maintaining exclusive privileges of systemic power. The seeds represents the potential and hope for deep systemic change and collective healing. What we sow, will become the future Harvest.

  Detail of The Harvest Lantern by Hitoko Okada, on exhibition at 20 Minutes of Action curated by Sally Frater at Centre[3], 2017.

Detail of The Harvest Lantern by Hitoko Okada, on exhibition at 20 Minutes of Action curated by Sally Frater at Centre[3], 2017.

HitokoOkada.Harvest.JPG

The Harvest Lantern by Hitoko Okada, on exhibition at 20 Minutes of Action curated by Sally Frater at Centre[3], 2017.